Charity Disparity


Menstuff® has compiled the following information on the issue of giving.

Gender disparity of corporate giving
Charity report ranks states, cities on generosity

2:11

Charity report ranks states, cities on generosity


Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

The Chronicle, a leading source of news coverage of the nonprofit world, said in a report being released Monday that Americans who earned $200,000 or more reduced the share of their income they gave to charity by 4.6 percent from 2006 to 2012. Those earning less than $100,000 donated 4.5 percent more of their income, the report said.

The Chronicle's analysis was based on tax returns filed by Americans who itemize their deductions, including their charitable gifts. Rankings were compiled for states and metropolitan areas based on the ratio of contributions to adjusted gross income.

According to the report, changes in giving patterns were most pronounced in major cities, where the percentage of income that residents donated dropped markedly between 2006 and 2012. In Philadelphia and Buffalo, New York, the share of income given to charity fell by more than 10 percent; there was a 9 percent drop in Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul and Washington, D.C.

Tami Phillips of the Midnight Mission, a Los Angeles charity serving homeless people, credited gifts from low- and moderate-income people, for helping sustain its programs during the recession.

"It hits closer to home," said Phillips. "Any day, they too could become homeless."

The Chronicle's editor, Stacy Palmer, noted that wealthy donors, overall, were more oriented toward support of the arts and higher education than lower-income donors, and less oriented toward support of social-service charities.

At the state level, residents of Utah were the nation's most generous, donating $65.60 to charity for every $1,000 they earned. One factor is Utah's large presence of Mormons, whose church practices call for them to give at least 10 percent of their income to charity.

Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee - also with high proportions of loyal churchgoers - were next in the rankings.

At the bottom of the list was New Hampshire, where residents gave $17.40 for every $1,000 they earned. Its neighbors, Maine and Vermont, were the next lowest.

Palmer suggested that the low rankings for northern New England stemmed in part from low rates of church attendance, but also from residents' "independent streak" and a tradition of self-reliance.

Nevada was the state with the fastest-growing rate of donations as a share of income, jumping nearly 13 percent from 2006 to 2012. Its major metropolis, Las Vegas, was the fastest-growing city in terms of generosity, rising 21 places since 2006 in a ranking of the country's 50 largest urban areas.

North Dakota experienced the biggest decline in giving. Residents reduced the share of income they donated by nearly 16 percent, contributing $24 for every $1,000 earned on average. The Chronicle said that dip could have serious implications, given the increasing demand for social services as newcomers stream in to take advantage of the state's oil boom.

Among the 50 largest cities, Salt Lake City had the most generous residents, giving away 5.4 percent of their incomes. It was followed by Memphis, Tennessee; Birmingham, Alabama; Atlanta, and Nashville, Tennessee.

In sixth place was Jacksonville, Florida - which trailed only Las Vegas for the biggest growth rate in giving between 2006 and 2012.

The report detailed how Jacksonville donors had rallied behind a campaign to improve the region's public schools via a Quality Education for All fund launched in 2005 with a goal of raising $50 million. The effort has borne fruit, with Duval County's graduation rate rising from 53.5 percent in 2008 to 72 percent in 2013, and a new campaign is underway focusing on 37 of the district's historically lowest-performing schools.

The cities where residents gave the smallest share of their income to charity were Hartford, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island, and San Jose, California.
Source: www.aol.com/article/2014/10/06/charity-report-ranks-states-cities-on-generosity/20972939/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec3_lnk4%26pLid%3D540872

Gender disparity of corporate giving


This chart shows 85 of the corporations you may know and even utilize their products or services. Their gifting to Female (Women & Girls) Charities and Male (Men & Boys) charities often reflects their contributions to local organizations in areas where they have employees. This chart demonstrates that, of the $31 million dollars given to Women & Girls and Men & Boys charities by these 85 corporations, only 25% of the funds went to Men & Boys programs (which represent only 29% of the organizations funded). Only 12 (14%) of the 85 corporations gave a larger gift to Men & Boys programs with 4 giving an equal amount. In the case of Men & Boys programs, the one most often gifted appears to be the Boy Scouts.

While there is no question as to the validity of this spending pattern, it doesn't necessarily mean that the corporations are intentionally squeing their corporate gift giving programs by gender. There are two other major factors involved: (1) A charity must be recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a not-for-profit corporation, which many Men's and Boyss programs are not, and, (2) most importantly, the organization must submit a suitable grant request, which most Men's & Boy's programs don't. In addition, many corporations offer a matching grant program to their employees. However, if the employees don't gift your program, you don't get the benefit of these programs. It means outreach to those who use your services. It means "asking for help."

Corporation

Female Charities
Male Charities

Difference

.

Number
Total Contribution
Number
Total Contribution

.

Abbot Labs

9

$145,450

3

$ 34,450

$ - 110,950

ABC

9

157,000

2

57,000

- 100,000

Aetna

10

359,000

0
0

- 359,000

Alcoa

48

1,181,034

4

81,250

- 1,099,784

Allstate

16

650,590

10

350,590

- 300,000

American Express

19

323,500

4

65,000

- 258,500

Anheuser-Busch

2

127,000

2

213,611

+ 86,611

AT&T

30

1,408,874

10

220,499

- 1,188,375

Bank of America

42

979,978

34

461,834

- 518,144

Bank One

5

95,000

4

45,000

- 50,000

Bayer

2

40,000

0
0

- 40,000

Boeing-McDonell

5

207,500

5

115,500

- 92,000

BP Amoco

11

310,000

16

210,000

- 100,000

Bristol-Myers Squibb

27

1,872,200

4

85,000

- 1,787,200

Caterpillar

4

70,000

2

35,000

- 35,000

Cisco Systems

10

121,000

3

45,000

- 76,000

Citigroup

37

1,470,000

10

422,000

- 1,048,000

Clorox

1

10,000

1

10,000

+/-

Coca Cola

4

230,000

1

50,000

- 180,000

Conagra

11

470,000

7

425,000

- 45,000

Corning

2

20,000

1

10,000

- 10,000

Cumins

1

12,500

1

20,000

+ 7,500

Daimler-Crysler

14

295,000

8

158,500

- 136,500

John Deere

2

50,000

2

40,000

- 10,000

Delta

0
0
1

25,000

+ 25,000

Walt Disney

2

35,000

1

20,000

- 15,000

Dow Chemical

6

108,000

4

51,000

- 57,000

Eastman Kodak

5

190,000

1

10,000

- 180,000

Enterprise

4

40,000

4

40,000

+/-

Exxon Mobil

1

600,000

0
0

- 600,000

Fannie May

43

924,000

6

99,100

- 824,900

Ford

11

389,000

7

181,500

- 207,500

General Mills

22

479,500

10

202,000

- 277,500

General Motors

6
12

446,000
288,200

8
6

455,000
446,000

+ 9,000
+ 157,800

Hallmark Cards

6

97,200

6

110,500

+ 13,300

H.J. Heinz

6

147,500

2

22,000

- 125,500

Hitachi

3

159,000

0
0

- 159,000

Honeywell

10

199,200

3

82,500

- 116,700

Intel

8

177,500

2

57,500

- 120,000

International Paper

4

47,000

3

35,000

- 12,000

SC Johnson

0

0

1

10,000

+ 10,000

Kellogg's

3

100,000

2

40,000

- 60,000

Kimberly Clark

7

779,000

4

204,000

- 575,000

Sara Lee

15

221,500

1

10,000

- 211,500

Eli Lilly

5

167,500

1

25,000

- 142,500

Mattel

1

15,000

1

15,000

+/-

May Co

10

452,200

3

153,950

- 298,250

Maytag

2

20,000

1

10,000

- 10,000

Mead

3

108,000

7

50,000

- 58,000

Medtronic

20

265,600

4

45,000

- 220,600

Merck

7

230,000

2

40,000

- 190,000

Merrill Lynch

8

310,000

2

20,000

- 290,000

Metro Life

4

480,000

1

180,000

- 300,000

3M

12

324,500

6

144,600

- 179,900

Monsanto

0
0
1

32,000

+ 32,000

JP Morgan-Chase

14

215,000

2

75,000

-140,000

Motorola

6

66,400

2

24,400

- 42,000

New York Life

5

295,500

1

23,000

- 272,500

New York Times

1

15,000

0
0

- 15,000

Northwestern Mutual

13

296,000

2

70,000

- 226,000

Pepsico

1

15,000

2

110,000

+ 95,000

Pharmack

2

45,000

0
0

- 45,000

Pillsbury

8

891,200

7

856,200

- 35,000

PPG Industries

7

135,000

1

10,000

-125,000

Proctor & Gamble

12

311,500

9

289,500

- 22,000

Prudential

21

1,021,000

6

155,000

- 866,000

Qwest

3

178,500

0

0

- 178,500

Ralph's Foods

1

10,000

3

187,000

+ 177,000

Ralston Purina

1

50,000

0
0

- 50,000

Charles Schwab

1

25,000

0
0

- 25,000

Scripps Howard

2

28,000

2

33,000

+ 5,000

Shell

6

153,000

2

75,000

- 78,000

Slim Fast

5

509,000

0

0

- 509,000

Sprint

5

134,500

3

121,500

- 12,500

State Farm

6

291,666

1

20,000

- 271,666

Levi Strauss

NA

1,496,000

3

34,450

- 1,461,550

Target

14

228,000

2

28,000

- 200,000

Tenet Healthcare

14

415,000

3

30,000

- 385,000

Texaco

1

30,000

0
0

- 30,000

Texas Instruments

2

60,000

1

50,000

- 10,000

Times Mirror

0
0
1

125,000

+ 125,000

Union Bank

3

75,000

0
0

- 75,000

Union Pacific

7

87,500

4

72,500

- 15,000

US Steel

3

60,000

2

60,000

+/-

UPS

42

2,153,310

14

983,000

- 1,170,310

Grand Total (85)

773

27,703,000

309

9,408,000

- 18,295,000

% of Total

71%
75%
29%
25%

.

Source: Corporation Foundation Profiles, 12th edition

*    *    *

The white man knows how to make everything, but he does not know how to distribute it. - Sitting Bull

 



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