Differing Abilities Issues

Menstuff® has gathered information on the issue of differing abilities: for people and fathers with differing abililties, differing abililties children, parents and family members raising differing abililties or mentally challenged children and the people who serve them. Nationwide, there are approximately 5.8 million children reported to have differing abililties including 200,000 infants and toddlers, 600,000 preschool-age children, 2,700,000 children ages 6 to 11, and 2,300,000 children ages 12 to 17.

Over 3.5 million Americans are on the autism spectrum, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And prevalence of autism has spiked — from 2000 to 2010, autism increased 119% in U.S. children. When they grow up, they need to be considered by potential employers. The Arc, a national organization of and for people with intellectual and related developmental disabilities,noted that many people with developmental disabilities (like autism) are unemployed or underemployed, meaning they have the capacity to work beyond low skill jobs.

Disclaimer - Information is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. Any medical decisions should be made in conjunction with your physician. We will not be liable for any complications, injuries or other medical accidents arising from or in connection with, the use of or reliance upon any information on the web.



Don't Laugh at Me
Gentleman With a Family
Snippets on Differing Abilities Issues
Importance of Physical Activity

Newsbytes

Assistive Devices
Related Issues:  Blindness, Deafness
"I'm a Tab" Definition
Horny & Differing Abilities? Resources

Books
Magazines
Journals - on Child, Elder, Emotional, Religious, and Sexual Abuse and Trauma
Resources/links
Events

 

Don't Laugh at Me
Written by: Steve Seskin & Allen Shamblin
This song is from Peter, Paul & Mary's Songs of Conscience & Concern: A retrospective collection.
A country and western version by Mark Wells from Wish You Were Here was up for country song of the year 1999. His slightly different version appears below.

I'm a little boy with glasses
The one they call a geek
A little girl who never smiles
'Cause I've got braces on my teeth
And I know how it feels
To cry myself to sleep

I'm that kid on every playground
Who's always chosen last
A single teenage mother
Tryin' to overcome my past
You don't have to be my friend
But is it too much to ask?

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure
From my pain
In god's eyes
We're all the same
Someday we'll all
Have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me.

* I'm the beggar on the corner
You pass me on the street
And I wouldn't be out here beggin'
If I had enough to eat
And don't think I don't notice
That our eyes never meet.

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure
From my pain
In god's eyes
We're all the same
Someday we'll all
Have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me.

I'm fat, I'm thin,
I'm short, I'm tall,
I'm deaf, I'm blind,
Hey, aren't we all

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure
From my pain
In god's eyes
We're all the same
Someday we'll all
Have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me.

* Mark Will's version makes a substantial change in section four of the Peter Paul & Mary version, which seems to speak a deeper truth.

I'm the cripple on the corner
You've passed me on the street
And I wouldn't be out here beggin'
If I had enough to eat.
And don't think I don't notice
That our eyes never meet.

I lost my wife and little boy when
Someone crossed that yellow line
The day we laid them in the ground
Is the day I lost my mind
And right now I'm down to holdin'
This little cardboard sign...so

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure
From my pain
In god's eyes
We're all the same
Someday we'll all
Have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me.

Gentleman With a Family
Written by Cheryl, Bentyne & Marc Jordan
The Manhattan Transfer from The Offbeat of Avenues

Scarecrow, weathered and weary
Fragile and old beyond his years.
Here we are - chosen.
In your eyes, the truth lies frozen.

Soldier in the city heat
Refugee on every street.
And life goes by
Standing in the pouring rain.

He's a gentleman with a family.
A gentle man, living day to day.
He's a gentleman with pride,
one may conclude.
Sign reads, "Gentleman with a family
Will work for food".

Shadows haunting his tired eyes
Reaching beyond the empty hand.
Here we are - the chosen
In your eyes, the truth lies frozen.

Soldier in the city heat
Refugee on any street.
And life goes by
An apostle to these worn out souls.

He's a gentleman with a family.
A gentle man, living day to day.
He's a gentleman with pride,
one may conclude.
Sign reads, "Gentleman with a family
Will work for food".


Next time you might think what happened in that person's life to bring them to where they are. It could be your next door neighbor in a couple of years. And, it could be you. Check out the definition for a TAB.

Snippets on Differing Abilities Issues


The following highlights might be of interest:

Source: The Future of Children, a publication of the Center for the Future of Children, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation.


Activity for Persons with Disabilities


Facts 

Become Physically Active

Benefits of Physical Activity

What Communities Can Do

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, MS K-46, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, 888.CDC.4NRG or 888.232.4674 (Toll Free) www.cdc.gov

The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Box SG, Ste 250, 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20004

Assistive Devices


Thought the time would never come when the blind would see and the lame would walk? This special edition, focusing on overcoming disability, may change your mind:

Antonio Sanchez-Migallon lost his sight in an accident 42 years ago – and regained it a few weeks ago. Source: www.cnn.com/2000/WORLD/europe/03/16/bc.spain.blindnomore.ap/index.html

Marc Merger was paralyzed 10 years ago in a car accident. A few days ago, with the help of a new computer chip, he took a few steps, giving hope not only to himself, but to paraplegics all over the world. Source: www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,35056,00.html 

First there was LAKIK; now a new surgical technique, SRP, may result in even greater improvements in vision for millions of people. Source: www.healthscout.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/Af?ap=68&id=92141

Not many people would choose Harold Grace as a judge for a beauty pageant; after all, he’s been blind for 15 years. But Grace has a special ability to hear the beauty of intelligence and personality. Source: abcnews.go.com/wire/World/reuters20000320_2039.html

Anatomical Devices
(000)

All Ages
0-44
45-64
65+

Any

4,565**

2,491

1,325

748

Back brace

1,688

795

614

279

Neck brace

168

76

78

13*

Hand brace

332

171

119

42

Arm brace

320

209

86

25*

Leg brace

596

266

138

192

Foot brace

282

191

59

31

Knee brace

989

694

199

96

Other brace

399

239

104

56

Any artificial limb

199

69

59

70

Artificial leg or foot

173

58

50

65

Artificial arm or hand

21

9

6

6

Mobility Devices
(000)

All Ages
0-44
45-64
65+

Any Device**

7,394

1,151

1,699

4,544

Crutch

575

227

188

160

Cane

4,762

434

1,116

3,212

Walker

1,799

109

295

1,395

Medical shoes

677

248

226

203

Wheelchair

1,564

335

365

863

Scooter

140

12

53

75

Hearing Devices
(000)

All Ages
0-44
45-64
65+

Any device**

4,484

439

969

3,076

Hearing aid

4,156

370

849

2,938

Amplified phone

675

73

175

427

TDD/TTY

104

58

25*

21*

Closed caption TV

141

66

32*

43

Listening device

106

26*

22*

58

Signaling device

95

37*

23*

35

Interpreter

57

27*

21*

9*

Other

93

28*

24*

41

Vision Devices
(000)

All Ages
0-44
45-64
65+

Any device**

527

123

135

268

Telescopic lenses

158

40

49

70

Braille

59

28*

23*

8*

Readers

68

15*

14*

39

White cane

130

35*

48

47

Computer

34*

19*

8*

7*

Other

277

51

76

151


* Figure does not meet standard of reliability or precision.

** Numbers do not add to these totals because categories are not mutually exclusive; a person could be counted more than once for any device type.

Newsbytes


People With Disabilities (4/4/02)


HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson presented President Bush with reports from nine federal agencies outlining more than 400 specific solutions that the agencies can implement to support community living for the nearly 54 million Americans living with disabilities. The reports stem from the first comprehensive federal review of barriers preventing people with disabilities from living in their communities instead of in institutions.
Source: http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/333/8013/347693.html

Gallaudet University to Name Baseball Field in Honor of William "Dummy" Hoy (4/8/01)


Gallaudet University will dedicate its baseball field in honor of William "Dummy" Hoy who played professional baseball from 1886 to 1902 and who is credited with inventing the hand signals used by umpires.

Hoy, who was deafened at the age of 2 and attended the Ohio School for the Deaf, played for the Cincinnati Reds and the Washington Senators. He asked the umpires to raise their right arm to signify and strike and left arm to signify a ball. In 1961, at the age of 99, Hoy threw out the ceremonial first pitch to open the World Series between the Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees. Two months later on December 15, Hoy passed away.

On Sunday, April 8,2001 a breakfast and program, by invitation only, will be held in the University's cafeteria from 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Invited guests and speakers include Brooks Robinson, former Baltimore Oriole third baseman, Buck O'Neil, a member of the Veterans Committee, and Miriam Skaggs, a relative of Hoy.

After the breakfast, the guests will proceed to the baseball field where a plaque will be unveiled to commemorate the dedication of William "Dummy" Hoy Baseball Field.

Everyone is welcome to attend the dedication ceremony and watch the double header the Gallaudet Bison will play against Lincoln University. Persons wishing to attend the dedication ceremony at the baseball field should arrive at noontime. The baseball game will begin immediately following the ceremony.

Source: Mike Kaika, 202-651-5050 or mike.kaika@gallaudet.edu

Paraplegic climber scales Mount Rainier (6/18/00)


Peter Rieke reached the summit of Mount Rainier under his own power - the first paralyzed climber to achieve that goal, the National Park Service reported. Rieke, 43, a research chemist from Pasco, WA, radioed from the 14,411-foot summit at 12:23pm: "Base camp, base camp, this is the summit. We have done it!" Rieke, part of the Crank Rainer expedition that involved 40 experienced mountaineers, began his third assault on the peak June 8 at the 5,240-foot level using a hand-cranked "snow pod" he designed and built. He crossed the Nisqually glacier and then moved onto the Kautz glacier to reach the summit. Rieke lost the use of his legs in a 1994 rock-climbing accident.

*    *    *

I'm a TAB.
Most of us are. However, 85% of us will not be sometime prior to our death. What is a TAB?  Temporarily Able Bodied. Do something now to make life easier for those who aren't TABs. It may just make life easier for you down the road. Footnote: I had a stroke March 3, 2014 which has introduced me to a semi-disabled status. I knew what I was talking about.

You are unique. Just like everybody else. Anon

We tend to make courage too dramatic. Courage is often doing something simple unpleasant, or boring again and again until we get it down pat. People who are physically challenged and who have the determination to get around their handicaps are great examples because their courage makes them test their limits every day. Dave Thomas, founder of Wendys



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