By the Numbers Archive


Menstuff® has compiled statistics on various men's issues and will present new numbers each month. This section is an archive of a monthly column featured daily on our homepage.

Do You Ever Fantasize about Someone Else During Sex?
Do You Read While in the Bathroom?
Do You Refer to Your Mate by Any Special or Pet Name?
Do You Sleep in the Nude, in Pajamas, in Underwear or Something Else?
Do You Wash Your Hands in a Public Bathroom after Using the Facilities?  Do You Wash Your Hands if You are Alone in the Public Bathroom?
Has Anyone Ever Inadvertently Entered the Room When You Were Having Sex?
Have You Ever Made Love with Someone Older/Younger?
How Often do You Initiate Lovemaking Session, on Average?
If the Phone Rings During the Height of Sex, What are Your More Likely to Do?
If You Have a Pet, Do You Let It Stay in the Room When You Are Having Sex?
Myth # 281: Medical Research is Biased Against Women
What one part of your body do you consider your best?
What one part of your body do you consider your worst?
While Wearing Jockey Shorts, Do Men Pee Through the Fly-Hole, Over the Top, or Under the Leg?
Would You Be Embarrassed to Buy Condoms from a Salesperson of the Other Sex?

If the Phone Rings During the Height of Sex, What are Your More Likely to Do?


Women have more of a proclivity to answer the phone without interruptus, in which category they outstrip men (20 to 12%.)

Let
it
Ring
Talk &
Interrupt
Sex
Have Sex While Talking
Tell Caller You'll Call Back

Men

60
13
12
15

Women

65
13
20
10
Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

Would You Be Embarrassed to Buy Condoms from a Salesperson of the Other Sex?


Excuse me, Could I please have some, er, er, er...a package of gum, a copy of that magazine, and er, er... Buying condoms from someone of the other sex poses a problem for only about 24 percent of us, and surprisingly, there isn't much of a difference based on gender. Our guess is that not only have condom advertisers finally succeeded in their campaigns, but it's practically a necessity that you overcome whatever reluctance you might feel. Better to be safe than sorry! Now if you will only use them! Side bar: 30-54 women have the most fear followed closely by 18-29 males. Of all the groups, women 55+ have the least fear.

% Yes
% No

MEN

23
77

18-29

38
62

30-54

16
84

55+

19
81

WOMEN

26
74

18-29

27
73

30-54

44
56

55+

12
88

Those most reluctant to buy condoms from the other sex are a study in contrasts, as shown by the following profile:

Bashful Men
Bashful Women

Mostly 18-29

Mostly 30-54

Right-handed

Left-handed

Long hair

Short hair

Overweight

Underweight

Tall

Short

Little body hair

Lots of body hair

No kids

Lots of kids

Earn $25,000 +

Earn $25,000 +

High-school-educated

College-educated

Source:
Do You Do It with the Lights On?

Has Anyone Ever Inadvertently Entered the Room When You Were Having Sex?


The Oops! Factor. 35% of Americans have experienced the Oops! factor while making lover. And for men 18-29, 72% of whom proudly proclaim they've never been caught: just wait until you have kids!  The oops! factor is caused mostly by children (79%), followed by parents (27%) and siblings (6%). Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

If You Have a Pet, Do You Let It Stay in the Room When You Are Having Sex?


Among those who let the pet stay, do you let the pet stay on the bed while you are making love?

Yes
% No
% Yes
Stay on
the Bed

Men

64
36
29

18-29

89
11
21

30-54

51
49
33

55+

66
34
32

Women

67
33
37

18-29

93
7
50

30-54

56
44
40

55+

50
50
31

What Do We Do with Our Pets When Me Make Love?

66% of pet owners do, indeed, let their pets stay in the room when they are making love. And it's overwhelmingly the youngest surveyed of each sex who are willing to put up with this additional audience. Of those who responded, 41% have dogs, 39% have cats, 11% have birds, and the rest have gerbils, snakes, fish, and other assorted critters.

More women (37%) than men (29%) allow their pets to stay on the bed while making love. Young women 18-29 are by far the nicest when it comes to granting this privilege, while their male counterparts seem to be the most territorial. This must lead to a great many dogfights in the bedroom, and gives new meaning to the term "petting."

Men, if you don't like pets in the room, be wary of the following kind of woman, who just adores having her pet in the bedroom. She's apt to be a small, left-handed woman with short hair, and she's a mother.

Women, the men who love pets in the boudoir are tall, long-haired, and right-handed. They claim to be slightly overweight and have no children of their own.

Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

Do You Read While in the Bathroom?


Americans are a very literate breed...especially when it comes to bathroom reading. Nearly three-quarters (74% ) of Americans confess to reading in the bathroom.

More men than women are bathroom readers - explaining why you see so many male coworkers walking away from their desks with a newspaper under their arms. And it's the high-school-educated bunch who are 12% more apt to grap a piece of the paper than their college counterparts.

Total
Men
Women
Yes
74%
67%
80%
No
26%
33%
20%
Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

While Wearing Jockey Shorts, Do Men Pee Through the Fly-Hole, Over the Top, or Under the Leg?


Preferences may vary, but across it all th eunder-the-leg misters are nowhere near the favorites. And the mode of preference does differ depending on age: 50% of men 55 and over clearly like the fly-hole, while 67% of the younger men prefer over the top.

Those that are under-the-leg acrobats tend to be left-handed, high-school-educated individuals who make over $25,000. The exception to this rule? One of the authors, who is a right-handed senior citizen with a college degree, and who is decidedly lazy.

Thru Fly-Hole
Over the Top
Under the Leg
43%
47%
10%
 Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

Do You Refer to Your Mate by Any Special or Pet Name?


Men use:  Babe, Banker, Bean, Big Kahuna, Fuzzy, Gumby, Honey, Lady, Lovey, Mouth, Motor Mouth, Snuggle Bunny, Sugarplum, Sweetheart.

Women Use: Boogie, Brisket Face, Bunkie, Cuddles, Dear, Dreamboat, George, Honey, Honeybunch, Moron, Muttonchop, Romeo, Stud, Studley, Stupid, Sweet Pea, Tarzan.

Do you have some other favorites?  Use the e-mail address at the bottom of this page and send them to us.

Do You Ever Fantasize about Someone Else During Sex?


Men report fantasizing while having sex to a much larger degree than women, 51 to 37 percent...leading us to wonder if that's the reason men are more likely to always enjoy sex!

Anyone care to explain why men over 55 have a tendency not to dream (only 39%, compared to 61% for the younger men), while women who reach that same age bracket start fantasizing more than their younger counterparts?

The upper-income earners ($25,000 +) dream more than the lower-income earners (56 to 44%), while those who do not have a college degree fantasize more than those who do (59 to 41%).

A few more juicy tidbits: those couples who do not have children dream less tha n those who do have children; men who tell us that they are overweight fantasize more than those who are average or underweight; women with short hair fantasize more than those with long hair; and lefties fantasize more than righties!

% Yes
% No

Men

51
49

18-29

61
39

30-54

61
39

55+

39
61

Women

37
63

18-29

32
68

30-54

33
67

55 +

44
56
 Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

Do You Wash Your Hands in a Public Bathroom after Using the Facilities?  Do You Wash Your Hands if You are Alone in the Public Bathroom?


Nearly all of us wash our bands in a public toilet after using the facilities, with those over 55 being the most fastidious (men: 97%; women: 99%.) But, when no one else is around, 11% fewer men and 6% fewer women take the time to wash up. We only hope that these figures are not representative of the restaurant employees who completed this survey!

% Yes
% No
% Even
When Alone

Men

89
11
78

Women

95
5
89
Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

Do You Sleep in the Nude, in Pajamas, in Underwear or Something Else?


For men, nudity is in and PJs are out; Sears and JCPenney be forewarned! While overall 40 percent of us are likely to sleep in the nude, 53% of men sleep in the buff!  But that's not all: the "nudist" snoozers are these 18 to 29 year old men and women (58% and 32%, respectively).

Most women prefer to wear PJs, but what we're intrigued by is the "something else" that 27% of women claim to put on. Would it be some type of silky teddy - or something else, like her man's top shirt?!

Those women who sleep in the nude are likely to be tall and slender and have no children who could creep in on them. Like the women, the bare-it-all men are without kids, but they claim to be a bit overweight and are short in stature.

Nude
Pajamas
Underwear
Other

% Men

53
10
33
4

% Women

27
34
12
27

Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

How Often do You Initiate Lovemaking Session, on Average?


Quite simply, aggressiveness in lovemaking starts with American men, who seem to be the initiators 70% of the time.

The survey does uncover some female instigators out there. 7% of the women surveyed say they initiate lovemaking 100% of the time, with the majority of those women belonging in the 30-to-54 group. They might welcome an introduction to the 13% of men who also must always begin the lovemaking in their household.

And now we present the clues to the assertive women, or those who initiate lovemaking 70 to 90% of the time. She's a high-school-educated woman who earns under $25,000. Right-handed, she has short hair, claims to be a bit overweight, is small in stature, and has lots of kids.

Those men who initiate sex less than 20 percent of the time seem to be under $25,000 earners with a college education, and are left-handed with long hair. Tall and skinny, they don't have any children. (That doesn't surprise us!)

What one part of your body do you consider your best?


By their own admission. The people were asked, "What one part of your body do you consider your best?" This list is in order of popularity:

Men
Women
Butt
Breasts
Legs
Face
Face
Legs
Arms
Butt
Head
Eyes
Tongue (?!)
Thighs
Penis
Waist
Chest
Vagina
Brain
Nose
Eyes
Calves
Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

What one part of your body do you consider your worst?


This is a follow-up on last month's question, "What one part of your body do you consider your best." The question have been reversed. The people were asked, "What one part of your body do you consider your worst?" This list starts with the least favorite part, by their own admission.

Men
Women
Stomach
Stomach
Feet
Butt
Chest
hips
Knees
Legs
Legs
Thighs
Butt
Breasts
Nose
Eyes
Tongue (?!)
Feet
Penis
Lips
Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

 

Myth # 281: Medical Research is Biased Against Women


In 1920, the life span gender gap was only 1.0 year. By 1990, men were dying seven years earlier than women. So what has medical research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) done to reduce this disparity?

NIH Gender-Specific Research: As early as 1988, women's health was allocated 9.7% of the NIH research budget, compared to only 4.4% for men's health, with the remaining 85.9% going to research that benefited both sexes (1). By 1996, women's health funding had soared to 16.0%, with men's health only 5.7% of the total (2). Even more troubling is the declining male participation in NIH research. By Fiscal Year 1996, only 36.3% of NIH study participants were men (3).

The Heart Disease Controversy: Men's risk of dying of heart disease has long been almost twice that of women (4). True, women did not represent 50% of enrollees in the early heart disease studies. But after the 1961 thalidomide tragedy that maimed 12,000 infants, women were of no mind to volunteer for risky drug trials. So is it fair to say that females were "excluded" from clinical research? As the Institute of Medicine explained, "The literature is inconclusive about whether women have been excluded or importantly underrepresented in clinical trials" (5). Nonetheless, more than half of all participants in the Framingham Heart Study, which started in the early 1950s, were female. And beginning in 1970, women were equally represented in high blood pressure trials (6). By 1996, women's heart and lung disease research was funded to the tune of $220 million, compared to only $199 million for men (7). And men still face twice the risk of death.

Slighted by Cancer Research: In the earliest analysis of enrollment by gender, men composed only 40% of adults recruited into cancer trials (8), despite the fact that men's cancer death rates were almost 50% higher than women (4). This disparity has worsened over time, as revealed by a comparison of funding for breast and prostate cancer research. Each year, more people are diagnosed with prostate cancer than breast cancer. In 1991, the National Institutes of Health spent $92.7 million on breast cancer research, compared to $13.8 million on prostate cancer (9). Despite all the efforts to increase prostate cancer funding, the gap only widened during the following years: By 1998, $348.6 million went to breast cancer, while prostate cancer garnered only $89.5 million.

A Troubling Disparity, Any Way You Count It: In cancer research, prostate cancer has always been dramatically underfunded, and men have long been underrepresented in clinical trials. Any way you look at it—--sex-specific budget allocations, declining male participation in NIH studies, or comparative risk of death—--over the past decade, men's health has been shortchanged by medical research.

References:
1. NIH Advisory Committee on Women's Health Issues: NIH Support for Research on Women's and Men's Health Issues, Fiscal Years 1988, 1989, and 1990. NIH Publication No. 92-3456.
2. Office of Research on Women's Health: NIH Support for Research on Women's Health Issues, FY 1995-96, Table 11.
3. Office of Research on Women's Health: Implementation of the NIH Guidelines on the Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical Research, December 1998.
4. Department of Health and Human Services: Health, United States, 1998, Table 31.
5. Bennett JC: Inclusion of women in clinical trials. N Engl J Med 1993; 329: 288-291.
6. Young K, Satel S: The myth of gender bias in medicine. Washington, DC: Women's Freedom Network, 1997, p. 6.
7. Office of Research on Women's Health: NIH Support for Research on Women's Health Issues, Fiscal Years 1995 and 1996. Table 10. 8. Ungerleider RS, Friedman MA: Sex, trials, and datatapes. J National Cancer Institute 1991; 83: 16-17.
9. National Cancer Institute: Research Dollars by Various Cancers. www.nci.nih.gov/public/factbk97/varican.htm

Have You Ever Made Love with Someone Older/Younger?


For this question, men and women really proved to have separate preferences. Let's talk about the men first. 49% of men have made love to women 10 years younger than themselves, while an equal number have made love to women 10 years older. 21% of men have reached back 20 years, while 33 percent have reached ahead 20 years.

On the distaff side, women clearly go for older men as 90 percent have made love to men 10 years older, and 32 percent have made love to men 20 years older. Only 19 percent of women have made love to a man 10 years their junior. Seems that the majority of women still prefer older men!

10 Years
Younger
10 Years
Older
10 Years
Younger
20 Years
Older

% Men

49
49
21
33

18-29

14
43
14
43

30-54

50
75
17
50

55+

60
35
25
20

% Women

19
90
3
32

18-29

9
90
1
18

30-54

25
91
1
42

55+

25
88
13
38
Source: Above percentages add to more than 100 due to multiple answers.

We are particularly intrigued by the possibilities of men 18-29 years old making love to women 20 years younger. Whatever happened to just playing with Barbie dolls and GI Joes? Or is it just that some of our respondents went a little overboard in trying to impress?

Here is a profile of the more likely lovers by sex and age:

Made Love to Someone 10 Years Younger.
Men: Under $25,000, high-school education, right-handed.
Women: Under $25,000, college education, left-handed.

Myth # 281: Medical Research is Biased Against Women.
Men: $25,000+ high-school education, long-haired.
Women: Under $25,000, college education, left-handed.

Made Love o Someone 20 Years Younger:
Men: $25,000+, high-school education, thin, no kids
Women: Under $25,000, college education, short, left-handed

Made Love to Someone 20 Years Older:
Men: Under $25,000, college education, short-haired, tall.
Women: $25,000+, college education, short, left-handed.

This question provoked quite a response from our respondents. "I am 81 years old, and I very much enjoy making love to my girlfriend, who is 37 years old. P.S. She says I am the best lover she has ever had."

"I am a 52-year-old divorcee who finds herself very much attracted to young men - the younger the better. Recently I made love to a 17-year-old for five nonstop hours."

"I am a 51-year-old male who has been madly in love with a woman who is now 72 years old. We have been together for the past 15 years and she is the best thing that has ever happened to me since my divorce from a woman only two years younger than me."

"As a 22-year-old senior at a major university in the south, I have found that the male students just do not satisfy me sexually or intellectually. Therefore, I have been dating one of the professors, who is 53 years old. He is a wonderful lover and intellect and we have many things in common." Source: Do You Do It with the Lights On?

Contact: Men's Health America, www.egroups.com/group/menshealth/



Contact Us | Disclaimer | Privacy Statement
Menstuff® Directory
Menstuff® is a registered trademark of Gordon Clay
©1996-2017, Gordon Clay