Tattoos

Menstuff® has compiled information and books on the issue of tattoos.

Getting a Tattoo

Tattoo Removal
Scary long-term damages of tattoo ink on your body
Environmentalist or Not, Don't Go Green
Snippets
Newsbytes

Related Issue: Body Piercing, Talking With Kids About Tough Issues

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Getting a Tattoo


Many of today's tattoo artists have had formal art training, and have also served a rigorous apprenticeship with another tattooist to learn the technical aspects of the medium. But lurking in the shadows is the dreaded scratcher. The scratcher is an untrained tattooist who, for whatever reason, has decided that he has a great artistic gift to share with the world. The scratcher may work out of a studio, but often works from his home, the back room of a bar, or even your basement if he can persuade you to let him set up shop there. He rarely bothers about sterilizing his instruments, or changing his needles between customers. He's often had no training in tattooing, having purchased equipment through the mail. He may spread disease and certainly scars people for life. Beware the scratcher.

But, somewhere in between the dark world of the scratcher and the brightly lit sanitary studio of the professional tattoo artist is a shadowy world, populated by tattooists that have managed to scrape up enough money to establish themselves in a shop, and are working according to sterile procedure. Yet the tattoos they apply are badly executed, the outlines run from thick to thin, the colors are badly chosen and splotchy, and the actual artwork - well, suffice to say that perspective, proportion, and well thought out composition is not a consideration in this shop.

The first decision that you must make, after the big one of actually deciding to get a tattoo, is that you will not settle for anything less than wonderful work. Banal, boring imagery, uninspired colors, and badly drawn imagery has no place in modern tattooing.

You are responsible for choosing a professional who is capable of rendering a beautiful work of art on your skin. You are also responsible for choosing a design that will bring you joy and make you proud for the rest of your life. You may have to travel to get work from the artist of your choice. You will certainly have to invest some money in the project, not enough to feed a small nation, but good tattoos do not come cheap (and cheap tattoos are not good). Getting a tattoo is a big decision so take the time to educate yourself before you get inked, not after.

Scary long-term damages of tattoo ink on your body


We get it. You didn't think the little peace sign on your wrist would do harm, and the philosophical words on your back meant a lot to you at the time. In fact, you probably worried more about hiding the ink from your parents than you did about the major health issues.

However, recent research has shown that tattoo ink is actually much more dangerous to us than originally thought. According to a recent report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, the long-term impact is very scary.

Not only is the ink made out of extremely dangerous chemicals, like carcinogens, it has traces of lead, bacteria, nickel and arsenic. As the popularity of getting inked rises, so do concerns about it causing "cancer, genetic mutations, toxic effects on reproduction, allergies or other adverse effects on health," the report says. Additionally, the damage to the body's lymphatic system is probably significant.

As the report gains traction, so do countries researching these health effects. European countries such as Germany, France and the Netherlands are working to regulate tattoo application, and possibly "initiate the restriction process".

So, maybe the question to ask isn't "does it hurt?". Maybe it's "does it hurt my health?".
Source: www.aol.com/article/lifestyle/2016/08/30/scary-long-term-damages-of-tattoo-ink-on-your-body/21462061/

Tattoo Removal


It might have seemed like a great idea when you got that tattoo a few years back - but now you'd like to get rid of it. If this sounds all too familiar, don't despair, it might be possible to have the tattoo removed. The reason we say that it "might" be possible to have it removed, is based on the fact that there are many different things that need to be evaluated to determine what your choices are and what the end result will be.

The best way to determine if tattoo removal is best for you is to meet with a doctor who is trained in the use of lasers and does tattoo removal on a regular basis. Make a list of questions and take it along with you for your first consultation. Make sure that you get satisfactory answers to all of your questions.

What You Need to Know: About the Procedure. Who Is a Candidate? Preparing for Treatment. Pain. Recovery. Risks. Costs. How to Find a Specialist. Discussion Forums is MORE

Tattoo removal business booming

Environmentalist or Not, Don't Go Green


Getting a tattoo? If you think there's a chance you may want to erase it someday, (25% of people have them removed within 5 years), don't go green. Most green ink contains titanium dioxide, which is very difficult to remove with laser treatments. Removal of a red or black tattoo usually takes four or five laser treatments, at $150 to $500 a pop. But green tattoos can still be visible after up to 20 treatments. Note: Ankle tattoos are among the toughest to remove because the skin there is so thin.

Snippets


Source: MH-18, Fall, 01

Newsbytes


Have you seen anyone with a semicolon tattoo? Here's what it's about.


One small character, one big purpose.

Have you seen anyone with a tattoo of a semi-colon? If not, you may not be looking close enough. They're popping up...everywhere.

That's right: the semicolon. It's a tattoo that has gained popularity in recent years, but unlike other random or mystifying trends, this one has a serious meaning behind it. (And no, it's not just the mark of a really committed grammar nerd.)

This mark represents mental health struggles and the importance of suicide prevention.

Project Semicolon was born from a social media movement in 2013.

They describe themselves as a "movement dedicated to presenting hope and love to those who are struggling with depression, suicide, addiction, and self-injury. Project Semicolon exists to encourage, love, and inspire."

But why a semicolon?

"A semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life."

Originally created as a day where people were encouraged to draw a semicolon on their bodies and photograph it, it quickly grew into something greater and more permanent. Today, people all over the world are tattooing the mark as a reminder of their struggle, victory, and survival.

I spoke with Jenn Brown and Jeremy Jaramillo of The Semicolon Tattoo Project, an organization inspired by the semicolon movement. Along with some friends, Jenn and Jeremy saw an opportunity to both help the community and reduce the stigma around mental illness.

In 2012, over 43 million Americans dealt with a mental illness. Mental illness is not uncommon, yet there is a stigma around it that prevents a lot of people from talking about it — and that's a barrier to getting help.

More conversations that lead to less stigma? Yes please.

"[The tattoo] is a conversation starter," explains Jenn. "People ask what it is and we get to tell them the purpose."

"I think if you see someone's tattoo that you're interested in, that's fair game to start a conversation with someone you don't know," adds Jeremy. "It provides a great opportunity to talk. Tattoos are interesting — marks we put on our bodies that are important to us."

Last year, The Semicolon Tattoo Project held an event at several tattoo shops where people could get a semicolon tattoo for a flat rate. "That money was a fundraiser for our crisis center," said Jenn. In total, over 400 people received semicolon tattoos in one day. Even better, what began as a local event has spread far and wide, and people all over the world are getting semicolon tattoos.

And it's not just about the conversation — it's about providing tangible support and help too.

Jenn and Jeremy work with the Agora Crisis Center . Founded in 1970, it's one of the oldest crisis centers in the country. Through The Semicolon Tattoo Project, they've been able to connect even more people with the help they need during times of crisis. (If you need someone to talk to, scroll to the end of the article for the center's contact information.)

So next time you see this small punctuation tattoo, remember the words of Upworthy writer Parker Molloy:

"I recently decided to get a semicolon tattoo. Not because it's trendy (though, it certainly seems to be at the moment), but because it's a reminder of the things I've overcome in my life. I've dealt with anxiety, depression, and gender dysphoria for the better part of my life, and at times, that led me down a path that included self-harm and suicide attempts.

But here I am, years later, finally fitting the pieces of my life together in a way I never thought they could before. The semicolon (and the message that goes along with it) is a reminder that I've faced dark times, but I'm still here."

No matter how we get there, the end result is so important: help and support for more people to also be able to say " I'm still here."
Source: www.upworthy.com/have-you-seen-anyone-with-a-semicolon-tattoo-heres-what-its-about?c=ufb1

Tattoos Can Pose Health Hazards, Doctor Warns


Tattoos have become increasingly popular in the United States in recent years, but along with that comes a rise in problems such as allergic reactions and infections, an expert says.

More than one-third of Americans aged 18 to 25 report getting a tattoo, according to the Pew Research Center. But if you're thinking about getting "inked," there are some things to consider before you head to the tattoo parlor

"Since tattoos are not regulated in any way, there are many unknowns that could pose potential problems for consumers in terms of the inks and tools used," Dr. Michi Shinohara, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release.

"It is especially important for consumers to be aware of the potential risks, report any problem that develops to the tattoo artist and see a board-certified dermatologist for proper diagnosis and treatment," Shinohara added.

Tattooing inks have changed a great deal over the years and many modern tattoo inks contain organic azo dyes with plastic-based pigments that are also used industrially in printing, textiles and car paint. Many unknowns exist about how these new tattoo inks interact with the skin and within the body.

Allergic reaction to the tattoo pigments is one of the most common problems associated with tattooing. Infections also can pose a serious threat to health. Along with localized bacterial infections, there have been reports of people being infected with syphilis and hepatitis B and C due to non-sterile tattooing practices, Shinohara said.

Skin cancer is another potential risk associated with tattoos because they can make it hard to detect cancer-related changes in moles. If you get a tattoo, make sure it's not placed over an existing mole.

A tattoo can also cause a reaction that creates a bump that resembles a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Because it is hard to distinguish from skin cancer, the bump could lead to potentially unnecessary and expensive skin cancer treatment, including surgery, Shinohara said.

She offered the following advice for people who want to get a tattoo:

Go to a professional tattoo parlor and to a tattoo artist who is licensed according to state requirements. Insist on seeing tattoo equipment in sterile packaging.

Tell the tattoo artist if you have a reaction. If a problem lasts more than one to two weeks, see a dermatologist.

People with a chronic skin condition such as psoriasis, eczema or a tendency toward keloid scarring should check with a dermatologist before getting a tattoo.

Do not get a tattoo over a mole. Doing so will make it more difficult to diagnose a problem if the mole changes in the future.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about tattoos and permanent makeup .
Source: www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/news/20130301/tattoos-can-pose-health-hazards-doctor-warns?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Is Tattooing Safe?


If you're thinking about getting a tattoo, you should know what risks are involved. Before you make up your mind, read this article to find out whether a tattoo is a good idea for you.
Source: www.kidshealth.org/teen/your_body/skin_stuff/safe_tattooing.html

Body Art


Piercings and tattoos carry health risks.
Source: www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=512187

Have you seen anyone with a semicolon tattoo?


;

Here's what it's about. One small character, one big purpose.

Have you seen anyone with a tattoo of a semi-colon? If not, you may not be looking close enough. They're popping up...everywhere.

That's right: the semicolon. It's a tattoo that has gained popularity in recent years, but unlike other random or mystifying trends, this one has a serious meaning behind it. (And no, it's not just the mark of a really committed grammar nerd.)

This mark represents mental health struggles and the importance of suicide prevention.

Project Semicolon was born from a social media movement in 2013.

They describe themselves as a "movement dedicated to presenting hope and love to those who are struggling with depression, suicide, addiction, and self-injury. Project Semicolon exists to encourage, love, and inspire."

But why a semicolon?

"A semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life."

Originally created as a day where people were encouraged to draw a semicolon on their bodies and photograph it, it quickly grew into something greater and more permanent. Today, people all over the world are tattooing the mark as a reminder of their struggle, victory, and survival.

I spoke with Jenn Brown and Jeremy Jaramillo of The Semicolon Tattoo Project, an organization inspired by the semicolon movement. Along with some friends, Jenn and Jeremy saw an opportunity to both help the community and reduce the stigma around mental illness.

In 2012, over 43 million Americans dealt with a mental illness . Mental illness is not uncommon, yet there is a stigma around it that prevents a lot of people from talking about it — and that's a barrier to getting help.

More conversations that lead to less stigma? Yes please.

"[The tattoo] is a conversation starter," explains Jenn. "People ask what it is and we get to tell them the purpose."

"I think if you see someone's tattoo that you're interested in, that's fair game to start a conversation with someone you don't know," adds Jeremy. "It provides a great opportunity to talk. Tattoos are interesting — marks we put on our bodies that are important to us."

Last year, The Semicolon Tattoo Project held an event at several tattoo shops where people could get a semicolon tattoo for a flat rate. "That money was a fundraiser for our crisis center," said Jenn. In total, over 400 people received semicolon tattoos in one day. Even better, what began as a local event has spread far and wide, and people all over the world are getting semicolon tattoos.

And it's not just about the conversation — it's about providing tangible support and help too.

Jenn and Jeremy work with the Agora Crisis Center. Founded in 1970, it's one of the oldest crisis centers in the country. Through The Semicolon Tattoo Project, they've been able to connect even more people with the help they need during times of crisis. (If you need someone to talk to, scroll to the end of the article for the center's contact information.)

So next time you see this small punctuation tattoo, remember the words of Upworthy writer Parker Molloy:

"I recently decided to get a semicolon tattoo. Not because it's trendy (though, it certainly seems to be at the moment), but because it's a reminder of the things I've overcome in my life. I've dealt with anxiety, depression, and gender dysphoria for the better part of my life, and at times, that led me down a path that included self-harm and suicide attempts.

But here I am, years later, finally fitting the pieces of my life together in a way I never thought they could before. The semicolon (and the message that goes along with it) is a reminder that I've faced dark times, but I'm still here."

No matter how we get there, the end result is so important: help and support for more people to also be able to say "I'm still here."
Source: www.upworthy.com/have-you-seen-anyone-with-a-semicolon-tattoo-heres-what-its-about?c=ufb1

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Scroll down to 6:20 video

I've seen it all over Facebook and now I’m asking myself, “Why is everyone getting a tattoo of a semicolon on their wrist?” I decided to find out….First of all, the semicolon represents where the sentence could’ve ended but didn’t. Just as how suicide could be prevented but wasn’t. Many teachers are getting this tattoo in support of the fight against suicide in students. Three teens self harm every hour, teachers see this in students everyday and are spreading awareness to put it to a stop.

Their mission statement on Facebook reads…”We are trying to raise awareness about self harming. We are a group of people who will listen to your stories and help you get through any tough time, answer and questions, and give as much advice as possible.Together we can get through anything.”

If you know of someone who can benefit from this Facebook page, maybe even yourself, here is the link: www.facebook.com/TheSemicolonProject/info

Let’s stop the self harming, the suicides and the bullying.
Source: www.upworthy.com/9-beautiful-semicolon-tattoos-our-readers-shared-to-destigmatize-mental-health-challenges?g=2&c=ufb1

*    *    *

53% of Millennials sport at least one tattoo and 38 is the average age most
Americans (57%) think tattoos no longer look cool on you.
Source: PicoSure/Wakefield Reserarch survey of 1,000 U.S. Adults.

One in three adult Ameericans has a tattoo.



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