Menstuff® has compiled information about Hepatitis E (HEV).

What is hepatitis E?
How common is hepatitis E?
How can I get hepatitis E?
What are the signs or symptoms of hepatitis E?
How can I find out if I have hepatitis E?
What can I do to reduce my risk of getting hepatitis E?
What is the treatment for hepatitis E?
Why worry about hepatitis E?
Do I need to talk to my partner about hepatitis E?
Should I talk to my health care provider about hepatitis E?
Where can I get more information?
Resources
Free or Low-Cost Hepatitis Clinic Near You
- www.hepclinics.com
Related issues:
AIDS, Bacterial Vaginosis, Blue Balls, Chancroid, Chlamydia, Condoms, Contraception, Crabs, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, Impotency, Nongonococcal Urethritis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Reproduction, STDS, Syphilis, Trichomoniasis, Yeast Infection

What is hepatitis E?

Hepatitis E, known as Enteric non-A, non-B, is a viral hepatitis that is most commonly found in geographical areas lacking clean water and sanitation.

How common is hepatitis E?

It is not common or typical in countries or areas with clean drinking water and adequate environmental sanitation. Typically, people diagnosed with hepatitis E have become infected during travels to or stays in geographical areas lacking clean water or sanitation.

How can I get hepatitis E?

Hepatitis E is transmitted through oral contact with feces. This is primarily through contaminated water sources and a lack of sanitation.

What are the signs or symptoms of hepatitis E?

Symptoms of hepatitis E resemble those of hepatitis A:

How can I find out if I have hepatitis E?

There are no specific blood tests commercially available for detecting HEV antigen or antibodies. There are diagnostic tests available in research laboratories.

What can I do to reduce my risk of getting hepatitis E?

When traveling to geographical areas where the water supply is doubtful:

What is the treatment for hepatitis E?

Most people with hepatitis E experience a self-limited illness (one that runs a defined, limited course) and go on to recover completely. There is no accepted therapy, nor restrictions on diet or activity.

In most cases, hospitalization should be considered for people who are severely ill for provision of supportive care.

Why worry about hepatitis E?

There are no known long-term effects of hepatitis E. It is not known to cause chronic infections.

Do I need to talk to my partner about hepatitis E?

Hepatitis E is primarily transmitted by contaminated drinking water and is not thought to be sexually transmitted.

Should I talk to my health care provider about hepatitis E?

Outbreaks of hepatitis E have occurred in Asia, Africa and Mexico, as well as in other geographical areas lacking a clean water source and sanitation. There is no vaccine to prevent hepatitis E, so your health care provider cannot protect you from getting the virus.

Where can I get more information?

If you have additional questions about hepatitis E, call the National STD and AIDS Hotlines at 1-800-342-2437 or 1-800-227-8922. The hotlines are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For information in Spanish call 1-800-344-7432, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Eastern Time, seven days a week. For the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing call 1-800-243-7889, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. The hotlines provide referrals and more answers to your questions. www.ashastd.org/stdfaqs/hepe.html  

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