Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Menstuff® has compiled information on the issue of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID).

What is PID?
How common is PID?
How can I get PID?
What can cause an infection to spread into the upper genital tract?
What are the signs or symptoms of PID?
How can I find out if I have PID?
What can I do to reduce my risk of getting PID?
What is the treatment for PID?
What can I do to reduce my risk of getting PID?
Why worry about PID?
Do I need to talk to my partner about PID?
Should I talk to my health care provider about PID?
Where can I get more information?
Resources
Related issues:
Talking With Kids About Tough Issues AIDS, Bacterial Vaginosis, Blue Balls, Chancroid, Chlamydia, Condoms, Contraception, Crabs, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, Impotency, Nongonococcal Urethritis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Reproduction, STDS, Syphilis, Trichomoniasis, Yeast Infection
 

What is PID?

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a serious infection in the upper genital tract/reproductive organs (uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries) of a female. PID can be sexually transmitted or naturally occurring. It can lead to infertility in women (unable to have children) or life-threatening complications.

How common is PID?

Women between ages 15 and 25 have the highest incidence of PID. In the United States, PID is the leading cause of women who are unable to have children.

How can I get PID?

Two other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), chlamydia and gonorrhea, are the most common causes of PID. Other bacteria or germs can also cause PID. If you have an infection in the genital tract and do not get treated right away, it can cause PID. The infection spreads from the cervix into the uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. It can take anywhere from several days to several months after being infected to develop PID.

What can cause an infection to spread into the upper genital tract?

What are the symptoms of PID?

How can I find out if I have PID?

The diagnosis of PID can be made when all three of the following symptoms are found during a pelvic exam:

What is the treatment for PID?

Follow-up:

What can I do to reduce my risk of getting PID?

Why worry about PID?

Do I need to talk to my partner about PID?

Yes. Telling a partner can be hard, but keep in mind that most people with an STD don't know they have it. It's important that you talk to your partner as soon as possible so she or he can get treatment. Men are more likely than women to have symptoms of chlamydia or gonorrhea (two STDs that cause PID). It is possible to pass PID back and forth, so if you get treated and your partner doesn't, you may get infected again.

Should I talk to my health care provider about PID?

Yes. Because PID often does not have symptoms, you may need to talk to your doctor or nurse about whether or not you should be tested. If you are having unprotected sex or discover that your partner is having unprotected sex with another person, you may want to ask your doctor or nurse about being tested.

Where can I get more information?

If you have additional questions about PID, call the CDC National STD and AIDS Hotlines at 800.342.2437 or 800.227.8922. The hotlines are open 24 hours per day, seven days a week. For information in Spanish call 800.344.7432, 8:00 AM to 2:00 AM Eastern Time, seven days a week. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing call 800.243.7889, 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. www.ashastd.org/stdfaqs/pid.html

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